HEAVENS TO BETSY

Sep 24

nprfreshair:

When New York Times columnist Charles Blow was 7 years old, he was sexually abused by his cousin.  The traumatic experience sent him on a path of self-questioning in hopes of understanding how it happened, why it happened, and what it meant. His new memoir, Fire Shut Up in My Bones, is a unwavering account of his abuse and how he healed. 

In the interview Blow discusses the correlation between victims of child sexual abuse and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender identity:

"What the data shows us indisputably is that people who will later identify as LGBT have disproportionate rates of having been victims of child sexual abuse. So there are two ways to think of that — one of which I completely disagree with and one I agree more with.

On the one end, the abuse is making these young people LGBT. The science for that is completely flimsy. I completely disagree with that idea. On the other side … children who will eventually identify as LGBT are more likely to be targets of sexual predators. If you think of it that way, it changes our concept of how we need to nurture and care for children who are different. …

If you look at it that way you realize that in some cases, not all of course, in some cases the predator is targeting children who they already see as kind of having some kind of characteristics that will later be different. And that difference means they’re isolated. That difference means that they are already outside of the social mores, that the predator behavior is now somehow justified because this person is already outside the norm.”

Photo: By Chad Batka, NYT 


Sep 21
thecivilwarparlor:

POST CIVIL WAR MYSTERY- THE ORIGINS OF CHICKEN AND WAFFLES
The exact origins of this dish are unknown, although several theories about its origin exist. During the Civil War fried chicken took on a new significance. The frying process made chicken less prone to spoilage, allowing women to send it to soldiers fighting in the battlefield.
1600’s.. the Pennsylvania Dutch were eating a version of Chicken and Waffles; however, instead of frying their poultry, they used boiled or roasted chicken, which was then shredded and put on top of waffles with gravy instead of syrup
Waffles entered American cuisine in the 1790s after Thomas Jefferson’s purchase of a waffle iron from France. Recipes for waffles and chicken soon appeared in cookbooks. Because African Americans in the South rarely had the opportunity to eat chicken and were more familiar with flapjacks or pancakes than with waffles, they considered the dish a delicacy. For decades, it remained “a special-occasion meal in African American families.”
Some historians place the origin later, after the post-Civil War migration of African Americans to the North. Fried chicken was a common breakfast meat, and serving “a breakfast bread with whatever meat [was available] comes out of the rural tradition.” The combination of chicken and waffles does not appear in early Southern cookbooks such as Mrs. Porter’s Southern Cookery Book, published in 1871 or in What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking, published in 1881 by former slave Abby Fisher. Fisher’s cookbook is generally considered the first cookbook written by an African American. The lack of a recipe for the combination of chicken and waffles in Southern cookbooks from the era may suggest a later origin for the dish.
Southern cooking would find its way up North, as slaves—freed after the Civil War—were lured by rumor of better jobs and opportunities. The dish can be found in the 1930s in such Harlem locations as Tillie’s Chicken Shack, Dickie Wells jazz nightclub, and Wells Supper Club
Serving up chicken & waffles”. Los Angeles Business Journal. September 22, 1997. p. 1.
http://www.theroot.com/articles/culture/2011/03/chicken_and_waffles_a_history_of_a_black_culinary_tradition.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_and_waffles

thecivilwarparlor:

POST CIVIL WAR MYSTERY- THE ORIGINS OF CHICKEN AND WAFFLES

The exact origins of this dish are unknown, although several theories about its origin exist. During the Civil War fried chicken took on a new significance. The frying process made chicken less prone to spoilage, allowing women to send it to soldiers fighting in the battlefield.

1600’s.. the Pennsylvania Dutch were eating a version of Chicken and Waffles; however, instead of frying their poultry, they used boiled or roasted chicken, which was then shredded and put on top of waffles with gravy instead of syrup

Waffles entered American cuisine in the 1790s after Thomas Jefferson’s purchase of a waffle iron from France. Recipes for waffles and chicken soon appeared in cookbooks. Because African Americans in the South rarely had the opportunity to eat chicken and were more familiar with flapjacks or pancakes than with waffles, they considered the dish a delicacy. For decades, it remained “a special-occasion meal in African American families.”

Some historians place the origin later, after the post-Civil War migration of African Americans to the North. Fried chicken was a common breakfast meat, and serving “a breakfast bread with whatever meat [was available] comes out of the rural tradition.” The combination of chicken and waffles does not appear in early Southern cookbooks such as Mrs. Porter’s Southern Cookery Book, published in 1871 or in What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking, published in 1881 by former slave Abby Fisher. Fisher’s cookbook is generally considered the first cookbook written by an African American. The lack of a recipe for the combination of chicken and waffles in Southern cookbooks from the era may suggest a later origin for the dish.

Southern cooking would find its way up North, as slaves—freed after the Civil War—were lured by rumor of better jobs and opportunities. The dish can be found in the 1930s in such Harlem locations as Tillie’s Chicken Shack, Dickie Wells jazz nightclub, and Wells Supper Club

Serving up chicken & waffles”. Los Angeles Business Journal. September 22, 1997. p. 1.

http://www.theroot.com/articles/culture/2011/03/chicken_and_waffles_a_history_of_a_black_culinary_tradition.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_and_waffles


iloveoldmagazines:

New York
1972 Vol. 5, No. 11

iloveoldmagazines:

New York

1972 Vol. 5, No. 11


historical-nonfiction:

Until 1976, Mormons could be legally shot on sight in Missouri



gosimpsonic:

Lousy two-legged pants.

gosimpsonic:

Lousy two-legged pants.

(via mmmsimpsons)



Sep 19
Happy bday @christy_coffey !!!!!

Happy bday @christy_coffey !!!!!


Aug 28

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